21 post tagged

python

Later Ctrl + ↑

Deploying Analytical Web App with AWS Elastic Beanstalk

Estimated read time – 6 min

If you need to deploy a web application and there’s an AWS EC2 Instance at hand, why not use Elastic Beanstalk? This is an AWS service that allows us to orchestrate many other ones, including EC2, S3, Simple Notification Service, CloudWatch, etc.

Setting things up

Previously, in our article “Building a Plotly Dashboard with dynamic sliders in Python” we created a project with two scripts: application.py – creates a dashboard on a local server, and get_plots.py – returns a scatter plot with Untappd breweries from Building a scatter plot for Untappd Breweries. Let’s modify the application.py script a bit to make it run with Elastic Beanstalk. Assign app.server to the application variable, it should look something like this:

application = app.server

if __name__ == '__main__':
   application.run(debug=True, port=8080)

Before deploying our app we need to create a compressed archive. This archive should contain all the necessary files, including requirements.txt that specifies what python packages are required to run the project. Just type pip freeze in your terminal window and save the output to a file:

pip freeze > requirements.txt

Now we can create a compressed archive. Unix-based systems have a built-in zip command for archiving and compression:

zip deploy_v0 application.py get_plots.py requirements.txt

Application and Environment

Navigate to  Elastic Beanstalk, click the “Applications” section and then “Create a new application”.

Fill in the necessary fields by specifying your app name and its description. After this, we are suggested to assign metadata and tag our app. The format of the tag is similar to a dictionary in Python, it’s a key-value pair, where the value of a key is unique. Once you’re ready to continue click the orange “Create’” button.

After this step, you will see a list of environments available for your app, which is initially empty. Click “ Create a new environment”

Since we are working with a web app, we need to select a web server environment:

On the next step we need to specify our environment name and also choose a domain name, if available:

Next, we select the platform for our app, which is written in Python:

Now we can upload the file with our app, click “ Upload your code” and attach the compressed file. Afterward, click “Create environment”.

You will see a terminal window with event logs. We have a couple of minutes for a coffee break.

Now our app is up and running, if you need to upload a new version, just create a new archive with updated files and click the” Upload and deploy” button again. If everything’s done right, you will see something like this:

We can switch to the site with our dashboard by following the link above. Using the  <iframe> tag our dashboard can be embedded into any other site.

<iframe id="igraph" scrolling="no" style="border:none;" seamless="seamless" src="http://dashboard1-env.eba-fvfdgmks.us-east-2.elasticbeanstalk.com/" height="1100" width="800"></iframe>

As a result, you can see the following dashboard:

View the code on Github

 No comments    590   10 mon   Amazon Web Services   AWS   dash   data analytics   python

Building a Plotly Dashboard with dynamic sliders in Python

Estimated read time – 2 min

Recently we discussed how to use Plotly and built a scatter plot to display the ratio between the number of reviews and the average rating for Russian Breweries registered on Untappd. Each marker on the plot has two properties, the registration period and the beer range. And today we are going to introduce you to Dash, a Python framework for building analytical web applications. First, create a new file name app.py with a get_scatter_plot(n_days, top_n) function from the previous article.

import dash
import dash_core_components as dcc
import dash_html_components as html
from get_plots import get_scatter_plot

After importing the necessary libraries we need to load CSS styles and initiate our web app:

external_stylesheets = ['https://codepen.io/chriddyp/pen/bWLwgP.css']
app = dash.Dash(__name__, external_stylesheets=external_stylesheets)

Create a dashboard structure:

app.layout = html.Div(children=[
       html.Div([
           dcc.Graph(id='fig1'),
       ]) ,
       html.Div([
           html.H6('Time period (days)'),
           dcc.Slider(
               id='slider-day1',
               min=0,
               max=100,
               step=1,
               value=30,
               marks={i: str(i) for i in range(0, 100, 10)}
           ),
           html.H6('Number of breweries from the top'),
           dcc.Slider(
               id='slider-top1',
               min=0,
               max=500,
               step=50,
               value=500,
               marks={i: str(i) for i in range(0, 500, 50)})
       ])
])

Now we have a plot and two sliders, each with its id and parameters: minimum value, maximum value, step, and initial value. Since the sliders data will be displayed in the plot we need to create a callback. Output is the first argument that displays our plot, the following Input parameters accept values on which the plot depends.

@app.callback(
   dash.dependencies.Output('fig1', 'figure'),
   [dash.dependencies.Input('slider-day1', 'value'),
    dash.dependencies.Input('slider-top1', 'value')])
def output_fig(n_days, top_n):
    get_scatter_plot(n_days, top_n)

At the end of our script we will add the following line to run our code :

if __name__ == '__main__':
   app.run_server(debug=True)

Now, whenever the script is running our local IP address will be displayed in the terminal. Let’s open it in a web browser to view our interactive dashboard, it’s updated automatically when moving the sliders.

 No comments    474   10 mon   dash   data analytics   plotly   python   untappd

Building a scatter plot for Untappd Breweries

Estimated read time – 7 min

Today we are going to build a scatter plot for Russian Breweries that would display the ratio between the number of reviews and their average ratings for the past 30 days. Data will be taken from check-ins left by Untappd users who rated beers. To make a plot we need markers with specified color and size. The color will depend on a brewery registration date, thus displaying it’s registration period on Untappd, while the size of a marker correlates with the range of beers represented. This article is the first part of our series dedicated to building dashboards with Plotly.

Writing a Clickhouse query

First, we need to process the data before using it in our dashboard. Here, we are using public data collected from Untappd. You can find more about this in our previous articles: Handling website buttons in Selenium and Example of using dictionaries in Clickhouse with Untappd.

from datetime import datetime, timedelta
from clickhouse_driver import Client
import plotly.graph_objects as go
import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
client = Client(host='ec1-2-34-567-89.us-east-2.compute.amazonaws.com', user='default', password='', port='9000', database='default')

Our scatter plot will depend on the  get_scatter_plot(n_days, top_n) function, which takes two arguments denoting a time span and a number of breweries to display. Let’s write a SQL query to calculate the Brewery Pure Average. It can be presented the following: multiply the beer rating by the total number of ratings and divide it by the number of brewery reviews. We will also pass a brewery name and its beer range to the query, these parameters can be fetched from our dictionary using the  dictGet function. We are only interested in those breweries that have Brewery Pure Average > 0 and the number of reviews > 100.

brewery_pure_average = client.execute(f"""
SELECT
       t1.brewery_id,
       sum(t1.beer_pure_average_mult_count / t2.count_for_that_brewery) AS brewery_pure_average,
       t2.count_for_that_brewery,
       dictGet('breweries', 'brewery_name', toUInt64(t1.brewery_id)),
       dictGet('breweries', 'beer_count', toUInt64(t1.brewery_id)),
       t3.stats_age_on_service / 365
   FROM
   (
       SELECT
           beer_id,
           brewery_id,
           sum(rating_score) AS beer_pure_average_mult_count
       FROM beer_reviews
       WHERE created_at >= today()-{n_days}
       GROUP BY
           beer_id,
           brewery_id
   ) AS t1
   ANY LEFT JOIN
   (
       SELECT
           brewery_id,
           count(rating_score) AS count_for_that_brewery
       FROM beer_reviews
       WHERE created_at >= today()-{n_days}
       GROUP BY brewery_id
   ) AS t2 ON t1.brewery_id = t2.brewery_id
   ANY LEFT JOIN
   (
       SELECT
           brewery_id,
           stats_age_on_service
       FROM brewery_info
   ) AS t3 ON t1.brewery_id = t3.brewery_id
   GROUP BY
       t1.brewery_id,
       t2.count_for_that_brewery,
       t3.stats_age_on_service
   HAVING t2.count_for_that_brewery >= 150
   ORDER BY brewery_pure_average
   LIMIT {top_n}
    """)

scatter_plot_df_with_age = pd.DataFrame(brewery_pure_average, columns=['brewery_id', 'brewery_pure_average', 'rating_count', 'brewery_name', 'beer_count'])

Working with a DataFrame

Add two dotted lines that will pass through the median values of each axis. That way we can find out which breweries are above average, the best ones will be in the upper right area.

dict_list = []
dict_list.append(dict(type="line",
                     line=dict(
                         color="#666666",
                         dash="dot"),
                     x0=0,
                     y0=np.median(scatter_plot_df_with_age.brewery_pure_average),
                     x1=7000,
                     y1=np.median(scatter_plot_df_with_age.brewery_pure_average),
                     line_width=1,
                     layer="below"))
dict_list.append(dict(type="line",
                     line=dict(
                         color="#666666",
                         dash="dot"),
                     x0=np.median(scatter_plot_df_with_age.rating_count),
                     y0=0,
                     x1=np.median(scatter_plot_df_with_age.rating_count),
                     y1=5,
                     line_width=1,
                     layer="below"))

Add annotations to display median values by hovering:

annotations_list = []
annotations_list.append(
    dict(
        x=8000,
        y=np.median(scatter_plot_df_with_age.brewery_pure_average) - 0.1,
        xref="x",
        yref="y",
        text=f"Median value: {round(np.median(scatter_plot_df_with_age.brewery_pure_average), 2)}",
        showarrow=False,
        font={
            'family':'Roboto, light',
            'color':'#666666',
            'size':12
        }
    )
)
annotations_list.append(
    dict(
        x=np.median(scatter_plot_df_with_age.rating_count) + 180,
        y=0.8,
        xref="x",
        yref="y",
        text=f"Median value: {round(np.median(scatter_plot_df_with_age.rating_count), 2)}",
        showarrow=False,
        font={
            'family':'Roboto, light',
            'color':'#666666',
            'size':12
        },
        textangle=-90
    )
)

Let’s make our plot more informative by splitting breweries into 4 groups according to the beer range. The first group will include breweries with less than 10 brands, the second group for those holding 10-30 brands, the third one for 30-50 brands, and the last one for large breweries with >50 brands. We stored marker sizes in the bucket_beer_count list.

bucket_beer_count = []
for beer_count in scatter_plot_df_with_age.beer_count:
   if beer_count < 10:
       bucket_beer_count.append(7)
   elif 10 <= beer_count <= 30:
       bucket_beer_count.append(9)
   elif 31 <= beer_count <= 50:
       bucket_beer_count.append(11)
   else:
       bucket_beer_count.append(13)
scatter_plot_df_with_age['bucket_beer_count'] = bucket_beer_count

Next step is to perform age-based splitting

bucket_age = []
for age in scatter_plot_df_with_age.age_on_service:
   if age < 4:
       bucket_age.append(0)
   elif 4 <= age <= 6:
       bucket_age.append(1)
   elif 6 < age < 8:
       bucket_age.append(2)
   else:
       bucket_age.append(3)
scatter_plot_df_with_age['bucket_age'] = bucket_age

Let’s divide our DataFrame into 4 parts to build separate scatter plots with its own color and size.

scatter_plot_df_0 = scatter_plot_df[scatter_plot_df.bucket == 0]
scatter_plot_df_1 = scatter_plot_df[scatter_plot_df.bucket == 1]
scatter_plot_df_2 = scatter_plot_df[scatter_plot_df.bucket == 2]
scatter_plot_df_3 = scatter_plot_df[scatter_plot_df.bucket == 3]

Plotting

Now we are ready to build the plot, add our 4 brewery groups one by one, setting its key parameters: name, marker color, annotation transparency and text.

fig = go.Figure()
fig.add_trace(go.Scatter(
    x=scatter_plot_df_0.rating_count,
    y=scatter_plot_df_0.brewery_pure_average,
    name='< 4',
    mode='markers',
    opacity=0.85,
    text=scatter_plot_df_0.name_count,
    marker_color='rgb(114, 183, 178)',
    marker_size=scatter_plot_df_0.bucket_beer_count,
    textfont={"family":"Roboto, light",
              "color":"black"
             }
))

fig.add_trace(go.Scatter(
    x=scatter_plot_df_1.rating_count,
    y=scatter_plot_df_1.brewery_pure_average,
    name='4 – 6',
    mode='markers',
    opacity=0.85,
    marker_color='rgb(76, 120, 168)',
    text=scatter_plot_df_1.name_count,
    marker_size=scatter_plot_df_1.bucket_beer_count,
    textfont={"family":"Roboto, light",
              "color":"black"
             }
))

fig.add_trace(go.Scatter(
    x=scatter_plot_df_2.rating_count,
    y=scatter_plot_df_2.brewery_pure_average,
    name='6 – 8',
    mode='markers',
    opacity=0.85,
    marker_color='rgb(245, 133, 23)',
    text=scatter_plot_df_2.name_count,
    marker_size=scatter_plot_df_2.bucket_beer_count,
    textfont={"family":"Roboto, light",
              "color":"black"
             }
))

fig.add_trace(go.Scatter(
    x=scatter_plot_df_3.rating_count,
    y=scatter_plot_df_3.brewery_pure_average,
    name='8+',
    mode='markers',
    opacity=0.85,
    marker_color='rgb(228, 87, 86)',
    text=scatter_plot_df_3.name_count,
    marker_size=scatter_plot_df_3.bucket_beer_count,
    textfont={"family":"Roboto, light",
              "color":"black"
             }
))

fig.update_layout(
    title=f"The ratio between the number of reviews and the average brewery rating for the past <br> {n_days} days, top {top_n} breweries",
    font={
            'family':'Roboto, light',
            'color':'black',
            'size':14
        },
    plot_bgcolor='rgba(0,0,0,0)',
    yaxis_title="Average rating",
    xaxis_title="Number of reviews",
    legend_title_text='Registration period<br> on Untappd in years:',
    height=750,
    shapes=dict_list,
    annotations=annotations_list
)

Voila, the scatter plot is done! Each point is a separate brewery. The color shows the brewery beer range and when hovering we will see a summary including the average rating for the past 30 days, number of reviews, brewery name, and beer range. The dotted lines are passing through the median values we calculated with NumPy, they’re showing us the best breweries in the upper right. In our next article, we are going to create a breweries dashboard with dynamic parameters.

 No comments    374   11 mon   dash   plotly   python   untappd

Gathering fresh proxies with Python for Free

Estimated read time – 4 min

Sometimes, when we try to parse a website with Selenium our IP address might get blacklisted. That’s why it’s better to use a proxy. Today we are going to write a script that would scrape new proxies, do checking and, in case of success, pass them to Selenium

Scraping fresh proxies

Let’s start by importing libraries, we will need modules for sending requests, scraping and storing data.

import requests_html
from bs4 import BeautifulSoup
import pickle
import requests

All proxies wiil be stored in the px_list and written to  proxis.pickle. Data will be loaded from this file if it’s not empty.

px_list = set()
try:
    with open('proxis.pickle', 'rb') as f:
            px_list = pickle.load(f)
except:
    pass

The  scrap_proxy() function will navigate to free-proxy-list.net and gather the latest 20 proxies, which are updated every minute on the site. Here’s the field we are interested in:

We will need to extract an IP Address and Port. Let’s inspect elements on this page:

The data we need to gather is represented as table cells. We will take the first 20 cells with a for loop, and request an IP-address and Port with xpath. Finally, the function will send fresh proxies to the pickle file and return them as a list.

def scrap_proxy():  
    global px_list
    px_list = set()

    session = requests_html.HTMLSession()
    r = session.get('https://free-proxy-list.net/')
    r.html.render()
    for i in range(1, 21):
        add=r.html.xpath('/html/body/section[1]/div/div[2]/div/div[2]/div/table/tbody/tr[{}]/td[1]/text()'.format(i))[0]
        port=r.html.xpath('/html/body/section[1]/div/div[2]/div/div[2]/div/table/tbody/tr[{}]/td[2]/text()'.format(i))[0]
        px_list.add(':'.join([add, port]))

    print("---New proxy scraped, left: " + str(len(px_list)))
    with open('proxis.pickle', 'wb') as f:
        pickle.dump(px_list, f)
    return px_list

Checking new proxies

Oftentimes gathered proxies might be not  working, so we need to write a function that would check them by sending a GET request to Google and, if there is an error, it will return False. In case the proxy is working, it will return True.

def check_proxy(px):
    try:
        requests.get("https://www.google.com/", proxies = {"https": "https://" + px}, timeout = 3)
    except Exception as x:
        print('--'+px + ' is dead: '+ x.__class__.__name__)
        return False
    return True

Main function

We will pass to our main function the scap parameter, which is False by default. New proxies will be gathered if the following conditions are met: scrap == True or len(px_list)<6. Then we gather new proxies using a while loop , take the last one to check, if check_proxy returns True , other proxies will be sent to the pickle file and the function return the working IP address and Port.

def get_proxy(scrap = False):
    global px_list
    if scrap or len(px_list) < 6:
            px_list = scrap_proxy()
    while True:
        if len(px_list) < 6:
            px_list = scrap_proxy()
        px = px_list.pop()
        if check_proxy(px):
            break
    print('-'+px+' is alive. ({} left)'.format(str(len(px_list))))
    with open('proxis.pickle', 'wb') as f:
            pickle.dump(px_list, f)
    return px

Changing proxies in Selenium

Сheck out our previous articles on Selenium about handling website buttons and scraping an online store catalog

Import the get_proxy function to configure proxies in Selenium and run a while loop. The PROXY variable will accept our freshly-grabbed proxy and be added to the browser options. Now we can create a new webdriver instance with updated options and let’s try to access the website, add some cookies, and if everything works fine the while loop will be break. Otherwise, the function will run until there’s a working proxy found.

from px_scrap import get_proxy

while True:
    PROXY = get_proxy(scrap=True)
    options.add_argument('--proxy-server=%s' % PROXY)
    driver = webdriver.Chrome(chrome_options=options, executable_path=os.path.abspath("chromedriver"))
    try:
        driver.get('https://google.com')
        driver.add_cookie(cookies)
    except:
        print('Captcha!')
 1 comment    239   11 mon   proxy   python   selenium

Building an interactive waterfall chart in Python

Estimated read time – 4 min

Back in 2014, we built a waterfall chart in Excel, widely known in the consulting world, for one of our presentations about the e-commerce market in Ulmart. It’s been a while and today we are going to draw one in Python and the Plotly library. This type of charts is oftentimes used to illustrate changes with the appearance of a new positive or negative factor. In the latter article about data visualization, we explained how to build a beautiful Bar Chart with bars that resemble thermometers, it’s especially useful when we want to compare planned targets with actual values.

We are using the Ulmart data on the e-commerce market growth from 2013 to 2014. Data on the X-axis is chart captions, on the Y-axis we displayed the initial and final values, as well as their change. With the sum() function calculate the total and add it to the end of our list. The <br> tag in the x_list shows a line break in text.

import plotly.graph_objects as go

x_list = ['2013','The Russian <br>Macroeconomy', 'Decline in working age<br>population','Internet usage growth','Development of<br>cross-border trade', 'National companies', '2014']
y_list = [738.5, 48.7, -7.4, 68.7, 99.7, 48.0]
total = round(sum(y_list))
y_list.append(total)

Let’s create a list with column values, we called it text_list. The values will be taken from the y_list, but first we need to transform them. Convert all numerical values into strings and if it’s not the first or the last column, add a plus sign for clarity. In case it’s a positive change, the color will be green, otherwise red. Highlight the first and the last values with the <b> tag;

text_list = []
for index, item in enumerate(y_list):
    if item > 0 and index != 0 and index != len(y_list) - 1:
        text_list.append(f'+{str(y_list[index])}')
    else:
        text_list.append(str(y_list[index]))
for index, item in enumerate(text_list):
    if item[0] == '+' and index != 0 and index != len(text_list) - 1:
        text_list[index] = '<span style="color:#2ca02c">' + text_list[index] + '</span>'
    elif item[0] == '-' and index != 0 and index != len(text_list) - 1:
        text_list[index] = '<span style="color:#d62728">' + text_list[index] + '</span>'
    if index == 0 or index == len(text_list) - 1:
        text_list[index] = '<b>' + text_list[index] + '</b>'

Let’s set parameters for the dashed lines we want to add. Create a list of dictionaries and fill it with light-gray dashed lines, passing the following:

dict_list = []
for i in range(0, 1200, 200):
    dict_list.append(dict(
            type="line",
            line=dict(
                 color="#666666",
                 dash="dot"
            ),
            x0=-0.5,
            y0=i,
            x1=6,
            y1=i,
            line_width=1,
            layer="below"))

Now, create a graph object with the Waterfall() method. Each column in our table can be of a certain type: total, absolute (both with final values) or relative (holds intermediate values). Then we need to set colors, make the connecting line transparent, positive changes will be green, while negative ones are red, and the final columns are purple. Here we are using the Open Sans font.

Learn more about how to choose the right fonts for your data visualization from this article: “Choosing Fonts for Your Data Visualization”

fig = go.Figure(go.Waterfall(
    name = "e-commerce", orientation = "v",
    measure = ["absolute", "relative", "relative", "relative", "relative", "relative", "total"],
    x = x_list,
    y = y_list,
    text = text_list,
    textposition = "outside",
    connector = {"line":{"color":'rgba(0,0,0,0)'}},
    increasing = {"marker":{"color":"#2ca02c"}},
    decreasing = {"marker":{"color":"#d62728"}},
    totals={'marker':{"color":"#9467bd"}},
    textfont={"family":"Open Sans, light",
              "color":"black"
             }
))

Finally, add the title with the description, hide the legend, set the Y label and add dashed lines to our chart.

fig.update_layout(
    title = 
        {'text':'<b>Waterfall chart</b><br><span style="color:#666666">E-commerce market growth from 2013 to 2014</span>'},
    showlegend = False,
    height=650,
    font={
        'family':'Open Sans, light',
        'color':'black',
        'size':14
    },
    plot_bgcolor='rgba(0,0,0,0)',
    yaxis_title="млрд руб.",
    shapes=dict_list
)
fig.update_xaxes(tickangle=-45, tickfont=dict(family='Open Sans, light', color='black', size=14))
fig.update_yaxes(tickangle=0, tickfont=dict(family='Open Sans, light', color='black', size=14))

fig.show()

And here it is:

 No comments    167   12 mon   data analytics   plotly   python   visualisation
Earlier Ctrl + ↓